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Port Angeles & Sequim Bed and Breakfast
Oceanfront Lodging on Washington's Olympic Peninsula



Yesterday was fun.  An I-thought-my-legs-would-fall off type of fun.  We hiked the Cape Alava trail, near Lake Ozette, to and along the northwest coast.  That’s a 9.3 mile hike if you trek the whole loop.  After the hike through the rainforest and the boulder-and-wood-strewn obstacle course along the beach, I was remind how utterly wild these beaches remain.  Here at the Olympic National Park, we don’t have driftwood, oh no. We have monumental driftlogs.  And you won’t find froufrou hats or umbrella-topped drinks here.  In fact, we were the only ones on the beach, as far as we could see in either direction. On a calm day like yesterday, it boggled the mind to imagine waves fierce enough to toss these massive tree trunks around like toothpicks. 

Our goal for the hike was to see petroglyphs carved into the rocks at Cape Alava about 300 years ago.  When I saw the ancient carvings, I realized that nothing on this beach had changed in the past three centuries.  Except for a few discarded trappings of modern-day fishermen, all is as it was on the day the Ozette tribe chiseled these images into stone.

Petroglyphs at Cape Alawa

Petroglyphs at Cape Alawa

Petroglyphs Carved by the Ozette Indians

Petroglyphs Carved by the Ozette Indians