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Port Angeles & Sequim Bed and Breakfast
Oceanfront Lodging on Washington's Olympic Peninsula



A Little-Known Twilight Star

February 22nd, 2011

 

Forks' Own Twilight Star: Katie the Weredog

Forks' Own Twilight Star: Katie the Weredog

A couple of days ago, Phillip (my husband and co-innkeeper of Sea Cliff Gardens Bed & Breakfast), visited the nearby Twilight town of Forks.  He stopped in for a meeting at the Chamber of Commerce, passing Bella’s red truck in the parking lot.  

The character that greeted him at the door absolutely deserves a starring role in Twilight.  Her name is Katie-the-weredog.  She was dubbed with that moniker by her person–whose name just happens to be Jacob.  Coincidence?  I think not.

And not unlike Edward the vampire, Katie passes herself off as a mere 16-year-old . . . which we all know in weredog years is really 112. 

~Bonnie


The Sequim Lavender Farm Faire is holding a contest to name the poster that will represent their Faire.  The Sequim Lavender Festival and Sequim Lavender Farm Faire will both be held on July 15-17, 2011, when lavender is blooming at its peak. 

Sequim Lavender Farm Poster by Pat Taynton

Sequim Lavender Farm Poster by Pat Taynton

Email your poster name entries to:  info@sequimlavenderfarms.org.  The winner will receive two free tickets to the Sequim Lavender Farm Faire.


We’re #27!  The Olympic Peninsula made the New York Times’ list of top travel destinations for 2011.  Of course we’ve known all along that this corner of heaven is a must-see, especially with breathtaking sights such as Hurricane Ridge, Cape Flattery, and the primordial Hoh Rain Forest.

But it’s always nice to be appreciated.

This week my daughter, Jill, and I did some hiking near Lake Crescent.  While about a third of the country was stuck in a deep freeze, we donned our sweatshirts and hiking boots and reveled in the emerald beauty surrounding us.  The “Moments in Time” trail is just two-thirds of a mile, but it’s a mini rain forest in itself, with neck-craning old-growth trees–some of which have been there since the turn of the millenium.  No, not 2000; the millenium before that.  And the trail to Marymere Falls, which cascades 90 feet over a vertical rock face, is a mile-and-a-half round trip–and so worth every step of it. 

Marymere Falls - Olympic National Park

Marymere Falls - Olympic National Park

This picture was taken with Jill’s hot pink cell phone.  Imagine what you could do with a real camera.   ~Bonnie